UN elects Saudi Arabia to Commission on the Status of Women - will Australia protest?

Saudi Arabia, the murderous regime of the House of Sword/Saud, the mob of misogynists who won't let women drive or leave home without a responsible male, the crowd of killers with whom Julie Bishop is looking forward to co-chairing the UN Green Climate Fund - and this is not a joke - has been elected to the UN's Commission on the Status of Women.

 

 

Commission on the Status of Women

The Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) is the principal global intergovernmental body exclusively dedicated to the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of women. A functional commission of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), it was established by Council resolution 11(II) of 21 June 1946.

The CSW is instrumental in promoting women’s rights, documenting the reality of women’s lives throughout the world, and shaping global standards on gender equality and the empowerment of women.

  • See more at: http://www.unwomen.org/en/csw#sthash.kmgyYSlH.dpuf

 

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Australian Army musos recreate World War One photo of band marching through Baupame

 

The Band of the 5th Australian Infantry Brigade, led by Bandmaster Sergeant A Peagam of the 19th Battalion, passing through the Grande Place (Town Square) of Bapaume, playing the 'Victoria March'. The ruins of the town are still smouldering, and smoke rises from the debris of surrounding buildings. A few miles away, on the Lagnicourt-Noreuil line, the fighting continues.The Band of the 5th Australian Infantry Brigade, led by Bandmaster Sergeant A Peagam of the 19th Battalion, passing through the Grande Place (Town Square) of Bapaume, playing the 'Victoria March'. The ruins of the town are still smouldering, and smoke rises from the debris of surrounding buildings. A few miles away, on the Lagnicourt-Noreuil line, the fighting continues.E00426

“Australian bandsmen, playing triumphal airs, marched through the blazing streets and burning ruins, indifferent to the perils of fire and shell and burning buildings, cheerfully confident in their sense of victory.” (The Ballarat Star, 10 April 1917)

In the early Spring of 1917, after a weary winter of almost unbearable trench duty on the Somme, German forces began to retire from the battlefield and strategically withdraw to the Hindenburg Line. The allied troops advanced on their heels, and the Australians soon burst through German defences to occupy the French town of Bapaume on 17 March 1917.

The troops entered a devastated town. The retreating Germans had methodically razed Bapaume in their wake; houses were pillaged and lay smouldering, and the streets were still aflame with burning buildings and obstructed by ruins and rubble.

“From the top of the knoll Bapaume lay beneath our feet, burning… half obliterated by the dense white smoke, we could see the burning roof beams of tall houses. Further still rose faintly through the smoke the square stone tower of the Town Hall. Every minute two or three heavy shells crashed into the town, flinging up great dense bursts of black smoke, or of red brick dust, and every now and then tossing to the sky fragments of wall or loot as a terrier tosses a rat. Bapaume was having a terrible time this afternoon.” (CEW Bean, Dispatch on March 17, Sydney Mail)

Australians of the 30th Battalion making their way along a street of burning ruins in Bapaume, the day of its occupation by our troops.Australians of the 30th Battalion making their way along a street of burning ruins in Bapaume, the day of its occupation by our troops.E00371

Soldiers on horseback passing through the wreckage in the Rue de Peronne at Bapaume.Soldiers on horseback passing through the wreckage in the Rue de Peronne at Bapaume.E00384

Yet the day after the capture of Bapaume, in stark contrast to the tragedy of the ravaged town, strains of lively music could be heard floating through the air. The triumphant bandsmen of the 5th Australian Infantry Brigade Band marched heroically through the burning streets. Their “Victoria March” reflected the jubilance of the triumphant troops who now occupied the town.

The photograph became one of the most publicised of the First World War, and was said to reflect the characteristic fighting spirit that animated the Australian troops in the dramatic events of the period. The photograph was published widely in Australian newspapers, and featured prominently in a major exhibition mounted at the Royal Academy of the Arts in London during 1918. The “Imperial War Exhibition” featured a gallery of Australian official photographs and war relics, including an enlarged print of the Bapaume photograph, which was displayed grandly as the visual centrepiece of the Australian gallery.

The Australian section of the Imperial War Exhibition at Burlington House, Royal Academy of Arts, under the auspices of the Imperial War Museum, London, 1918. Courtesy Imperial War Museum, Q 30499.

The Australian section of the Imperial War Exhibition at Burlington House, Royal Academy of Arts, under the auspices of the Imperial War Museum, London, 1918. Image courtesy of the Imperial War Museum, Q 30499.

Newspaper articles of the time proclaimed the photograph as an “historic picture” and “one of the greatest battle pictures ever known.” Several newspapers attributed the image to Wilkins, who had selected the photographic content for the exhibition whilst Hurley was in Palestine.

The Band of the 5th Australian Infantry Brigade was comprised of musicians from the 17th, 18th and 19th Battalions. The Bandmaster was 716 Sergeant (Sgt) Arthur John Peagam, a 32 year old Foreman Printer for the Bundaberg Guardian. Sgt. Peagam described the band’s march into Bapaume that day in a letter home to his wife, Margaret:

“Our brigade was well to the fore in this great advance, and the day after Bapaume was captured my band entered the town and played through some of its streets. The town was burning when we entered and when we left nine days later it was still burning. The buildings were all blown down and very few were left standing… Moving pictures were taken of us as we were playing through the streets, so if you see any such you will know it is us. We feel it was an honour to be the first band there. Nine days later when we were going back for a rest with the brigade, we passed half-a-dozen bands and they thought they were the first on the scene, but their lips dropped when they saw us going back.” (Bandmaster Sgt. Arthur J. Peagam, Letter 9 April 1917)

The film footage that Sgt. Peagam mentions may have been filmed by Wilkins himself, who captured footage he later compiled into a film, Bapaume to Bullecourt, a rare record of the Australians entering Bapaume to pursue the German troops as they withdrew to the Hindenburg Line. At approximately the 9 minute mark in the film, there is a silent clip of “An Australian Band Playing in the Square at Bapaume” which features the 5th Infantry Brigade Band marching through the smouldering town square. Crowds of soldiers mill around to sight the cheerful spectacle.

Despite the fact the Germans had deserted the town, the danger was far from over. Bapaume was littered with bombs. The Germans had hoped that the Town Hall adjacent to the square would be used as a headquarters, and planted a delayed action mine before deserting the town. It was from the vantage point of the Town Hall that the Bapaume Band photograph was captured, and both the band and photographer were lucky to escape the dramatic explosion of this grand building. When the bomb eventually detonated, approximately 30 men who were billeted in the building were buried in the rubble – only six emerged with their lives.

“The Town Hall and several other places were left standing, but they all had mines laid in them and were set off by means of either a slow fuse or an 8 day clock contrivance. The Town Hall was a very big building, and it was blown up by these means, and many men who were billeted in the building, also some officers, were buried by the explosion. We gave programmes in the square opposite this building every afternoon, so consider the band and myself lucky we were not there when it was blown up. The hour when the explosion took place was about 11:30pm, and we were all in bed asleep. The ground rocked and we were billeted about 200 yards away from the scene – all sorts of debris were flung about us. The building was about the size of the Melbourne Post Office, and walls and all were levelled to the ground.” (Bandmaster Sgt. Arthur J. Peagam, Letter 9 April 1917)

For the allied troops, who had held the trenches in the Bapaume area throughout the bleak winter of 1916, the capture of Bapaume had signalled a turning point – a farewell to the frozen battleground of the Somme and a new spirit of hope, inspired by the green countryside before them.

“We had put off the Somme battlefield as a man takes off a muddy coat. Before us the same shallow depression that contains Bapaume sloped away to the undulations on the horizon, the gently green sides of it gradually widening. It was an open, green, grassy country, with a few distant clusters of trees round the far scattered villages… it is the men who fought through Bapaume this morning that have finally cleared the Somme battlefield and closed the Somme battle.” (CEW Bean, Dispatch on March 17, Sydney Mail)

The Bandsmen of Bapaume went on to serve in some of the major battles on the Front; the second Bullecourt (3-4 May) in France, Menin Road (20-22 September) and Poelcappelle (9-10 October) in Belgium before the major German Spring offensive of 1918 where they fought some of the Australians’ most legendary battles; Amiens on 8 August, and the attack on Mont St Quentin on 31 August 1918.

ENDS

Bonus track - here's Simone Cocks singing our national anthem at Gallipoli during the 2015 Dawn Service.

 


Revealed! Russell Coight was LNP agency's inspiration for their character Aussie-Values Malcolm

No one is this awkward and unnatural.

Humans evolved as social beings.

But Chairman Mal has no affiliative gene.  

That's what makes the All-Aussie-Values series so special.

Everyday situations become hilarious as soon as Chairman Mal walks onto the set!

It's audacious.  It's a cartoon without the laugh track.

Malcolm Turnbull takes the genre way beyond David Brent.

And here's the artist on whom the agency modelled their Mal on-the-road character.

 


Gina Rinehart sets out the path to addressing the Asian middle-class food market - 2 billion people by 2050

I am constantly astonished by the bad press Gina Rinehart attracts from the Australian media.

They gang up on her with the obvious intent of damaging her reputation and prospects.

They don't seem to care about the truth.  It's much less important than being accepted by their gang.  

Gangs have enemies and targets.  The Australian media gang has decided Gina Rinehart is fair game for pretty much anything.

They are ignorant of or uninterested in her achievements, her vision and her contributions to Australia.

This video is an important contribution to our national opportunity to address a 2 billion person middle-class market segment on our doorstep in Asia (by 2050).

I have lived in Asia for the past 2 years.  Locally produced food is cheap but derided and middle-class people look for and are prepared to pay for higher quality produce from places like Australia.

All attractive markets attract competitors.  Australia has no God-given right to serve the Asian market.  We must earn it.

Gina Rinehart sets out how.  It will take plans, processes, faith and commitment.  But before we get to that stage, there's a preliminary step we've yet to take.

That is for us to decide what we want to be.  

Do we want to wallow in mediocrity, beholden to the dictates of faceless Greenie groups, the UN and every other freeloading busybody institution telling us how bad we are?

Or do we want to prosper.

If you want to see Australia prosper, watch this.

 


ABC News investigative report presents all you need to know about US/Australia relationship

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All the vapidity we've come to expect from the nation's $1BILLION per annum news and views broadcaster of last resort.

No news from ABC News.

Note the absence of two key words - Australia and America.  

Sovereign nations don't count as much as Twitter handles.

What do we gain by paying for ABC News to engage in a 140 character transactional world where complex relationships and intellectually, morally and ethically challenging problems are reduced to barracking and sloganeering.

At best, this "news" report from the ABC tells us @turnbullMalcolm "welcomed the commitment" of @realDonalTrump's administration.

To what?  Not that it matters.  Commitment is a weasel word that means nothing. 

Being committed to the kids being driven home safely from school is different from taking responsibility for being outside the gate at 3.20 every afternoon.

 

So thanks for coming Mr Vice President of the United States.

You'll understand you don't have as many followers as @realDonaldTrump on Twitter so despite your presence this can't be about you.  Or the USA.  

Nor trade, war, values, travel, jobs, visas, what we can learn from each other, things we can do together - just can't fit it into 140 characters so why bother?

But the commitment is welcome.  Now can we get @realDonaldTrump to say something funny, weird or out of context?  That'd be news ABC style.

And we welcome the commitment of the ABC.


Little Manly Florist, floral table decorations and the Vice President of the United States of America

Exhibit One - Saturday morning

This is Alice who's just started a new business, Little Manly Florist.

The member for Warringah is her local MP.  He was there to congratulate her this morning.

His demeanour is the same with Alice as it is with Her Majesty the Queen, the President of the United States or the security guards he speaks with every day.

That's because in his heart he cares for other people.

His life is dedicating to serving others - no to others servicing his ego. 

Exhibit Two - Saturday morning

That's Malcolm and Julie with the designer floral arrangements on their big table.

The table should be checked for damage after Malcolm and Julie's who-can-lean-forward-the-furthest contest.

It's apparently important to claim ownership of this moment.

Malcolm wants you to know he knows more about the US and Australia than anyone.  He's selected "military conflicts of the past 100 years" as his special category. Today it's his only category.  

He wants to talk about our history privately with Mr Pence.  No one knows why.

Our alliance is 60 years old, but it's really 100 years old, or 99 years old since we fought together in World War One, or 75 years old since the Battle for Milne Bay.  Which led into two references not to defence or protecting our borders, but to the US and Australia getting together to "turn back the Japanese".   Malcolm spoke like it could have happened yesterday - in fact the vividity of Malcolm's prose was exceeded only by the lividity in Julie's cheeks.

Mike Pence seemed a little more interested in the here and now.  While Malcolm established the pecking order by pointing out he's already discussed things with the President, Mike Pence didn't feel the need to include a preamble confirming he'd checked things out with Peter Cosgrove.  He seems a nice guy.

Malcolm summed up by reminding us it's about him and his family.  

Julie got a last word in to remind Malcolm meeting famous people from overseas is her gig.

Right now, Malcolm is choosing the photos and video edits for his Facebook page.  He doesn't know where the flowers on the table came from.

 


TWU WA bosses McGiveron and Burton get piddling fines over purchasing $150K Ford F350s for themselves

Remember the TWU's Ford F350 lovin' Richard Burton and Jim McGiveron?

The Federal Court has just fined Mr McGiveron $11,000 and Mr Burton $27,300 for repeated breaches of the Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Act.

According to orders made by Justice Michael Barker, In 2012, James McGiveron, then branch secretary, authorised the purchase of two F350 Ford pickup trucks costing $137,000 each, for Mr Burton and himself.

He did not have authority to authorise such a purchase, and admitted to the Fair Work Tribunal last year he knew he would likely receive one of the vehicles for personal use.

Mr Burton then authorised the purchase of add-ons for the two vehicles which brought their cost up to more than $300,000 total. The union's branch committee which acted in an oversight role was not notified of the purchase.

And thanks to Gillard and her IR laws, the fine for that is a pissant few grand.

These boys shopped for their cars here.

Barbagallo Motors - where cashed up trade union officials spend other people's money

I'm sure that Barbagallo Motors is a wonderful business - up there with the best of the best.   Why else would Rolls Royce and other marquis brands trust their reputations to Barbagallo.

It's because Barbagallo is up there with the best that self-respecting senior trade union official demand the Barbagallo customer experience.

And what an experience it is.   Here's the place His Humility James McGiveron and Richard (no Liz) Burton shop when their prestige motor vehicle itch needs a scratch.

 

And here are the Federal Court orders.

 

 

 

ORDERS

 
WAD 363 of 2016
BETWEEN: GENERAL MANAGER OF THE FAIR WORK COMMISSION
Applicant
AND: JAMES MCGIVERON
First Respondent

RICHARD BURTON
Second Respondent
  TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION OF AUSTRALIA
Intervener
JUDGE: BARKER J
DATE OF ORDER: 21 APRIL 2017



THE COURT ORDERS THAT:

The First Respondent

  1. Subject to Order 3 below, each penalty set out in the third column in the table in Schedule A to these orders be imposed on the first respondent in respect of the conduct correspondingly set out in the second column, being a contravention of the provision of the Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Act 2009 (Cth), correspondingly set out in the fourth column in the table.
  2. To the extent that Order 1 relates to a contravention numbered by an Arabic numeral in the first column in the table in Schedule A, the operation of that order be stayed for 60 days.
  3. To the extent that Order 1 relates to a contravention numbered by a Roman numeral in the first column in the table in Schedule A, the operation of that order be stayed for 74 days.
  4. Upon the payment, within 74 days, of the penalty for a contravention numbered by an Arabic numeral in the first column in the table in Schedule A, the operation of Order 1 be permanently stayed to the extent that it relates to the contravention or contraventions numbered by the Roman numeral or numerals of the same value in that column.

The Second Respondent

  1. Subject to Order 7 below, each penalty set out in the third column in the table in Schedule B to these orders be imposed on the second respondent in respect of the conduct correspondingly set out in the second column in the table, being a contravention of the provision of the Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Act 2009 (Cth), correspondingly set out in the fourth column in the table.
  2. To the extent that Order 5 relates to a contravention numbered by an Arabic numeral in the first column in the table in Schedule B, the operation of that order be stayed for 60 days.
  3. To the extent that Order 5 relates to a contravention numbered by a Roman numeral in the first column in the table in Schedule B, the operation of that order be stayed for 74 days.
  4. Upon the payment, within 74 days, of the penalty for a contravention numbered by an Arabic numeral in the first column in the table in Schedule B, the operation of Order 5 be permanently stayed to the extent that it relates to the contravention or contraventions numbered by the Roman numeral or numerals of the same value in that column.

The First and Second Respondent

  1. Pursuant to s 357(2) of the Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Act 2009 (Cth), the pecuniary penalties be paid to the Commonwealth.
Note: Entry of orders is dealt with in Rule 39.32 of the Federal Court Rules 2011.

Schedule A
1
2
3
4
No.
Conduct
Penalty Provision
1
Mr McGiveron’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU on or about 24 July 2012 by executing contracts to purchase two F350s and causing the TWU to pay deposits in the amount of $40,000 for each of the F350s, that exercise of powers and discharge of duties having been done neither in good faith in what Mr McGiveron believed were the best interests of the TWU, nor for a proper purpose.
$6,000
s 286(1)
(i) Mr McGiveron’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU on or about 24 July 2012, by failing to do so with the degree of care and diligence that a reasonable person would exercise in the circumstances, in that Mr McGiveron executed contracts to purchase the F350s and caused the TWU to pay deposits in the amount of $40,000 for each of the F350s.
$5,000
s 285(1)
2
Mr McGiveron’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU in or about July 2012, in relation to the adoption of a redundancy policy by the WA Branch of the TWU, that exercise of powers and discharge of duties having been done neither in good faith in what Mr McGiveron believed were the best interests of the TWU, nor for a proper purpose.
$5,000
s 286(1)
Schedule B
1
2
3
4
No.
Conduct
Penalty Provision
1
Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU on or about 26 March 2013 in purporting to act on behalf of the TWU in executing further contracts to purchase two F350s and on 2 April 2012 by causing a payment to be made from WA Branch funds of approximately $228,500 with respect to the F350s, that exercise of powers and discharge of duties having been done neither in good faith in what Mr Burton believed were the best interests of the TWU, nor for a proper purpose.
$9,000
s 286(1)
(i) Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU, by failing to do so with the degree of care and diligence that a reasonable person would exercise in the circumstances, in that on or about 26 March 2013 Mr Burton purported to act on behalf of the TWU in executing further contracts to purchase the F350s and on 2 April 2013 he caused a payment to be made from WA Branch funds of approximately $228,500 with respect to the F350s.
$6,500
s 285(1)
2
Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as Branch Secretary or Acting Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU between October 2012 and February 2014 in failing to disclose the purchase of the F350s to the WA BCOM, the relevant WA Branch Finance Committee and/or the WA Branch auditors, that exercise of powers and discharge of duties having been done neither in good faith in what Mr Burton believed were the best interests of the TWU, nor for a proper purpose.
$9,000
s 286(1)
(ii) Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as Branch Secretary or Acting Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU between October 2012 and February 2014, by failing to do so with the degree of care and diligence that a reasonable person would exercise in the circumstances, in that Mr Burton failed to disclose the purchase of the F350s to the WA BCOM, the relevant WA Branch Finance Committee and/or the WA Branch auditors.
$6,500
s 285(1)
3 Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as Branch Secretary or Acting Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU in July 2013 in causing the TWU to transfer to Mr McGiveron from WA Branch funds the amount of $348,396.15 (gross) with respect to Mr McGiveron’s redundancy, that exercise of powers and discharge of duties having been done neither in good faith in what Mr Burton believed were the best interests of the TWU, nor for a proper purpose.
$6,000
s 286(1)
(iii)
Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as
Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU in July 2013, in failing to do so with the degree of care and diligence that a reasonable person would exercise in the circumstances, in that Mr Burton caused the TWU to transfer to Mr McGiveron from WA Branch funds the amount of $348,396.15 (gross) with respect to Mr McGiveron’s redundancy.
$3,000
s 285(1)
4 Mr Burton’s improper use of his position as Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU to gain an advantage for himself, gain an advantage for others and to cause detriment to the TWU, by, in May 2013 by incurring an expense of $486.90 from the Rockpool Bar and Grill in Perth and causing this to be paid by the TWU from WA Branch funds.
$650
s 287(1)
(iv)
Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as
Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU in May 2013 in incurring an expense of $486.90 from the Rockpool Bar and Grill in Perth and causing this to be paid by the TWU from WA Branch funds, that exercise of powers and discharge of duties having been done neither in good faith in what Mr Burton believed were the best interests of the TWU, nor for a proper purpose.
$650
s 286(1)
(iv)
Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as
Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU in May 2013, by failing to do so with the degree of care and diligence that a reasonable person would exercise in the circumstances, in that Mr Burton incurred an expense of $486.90 from the Rockpool Bar and Grill in Perth and caused this to be paid by the TWU from WA Branch funds.
$650
s 285(1)
5 Mr Burton’s improper use of his position as Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU to gain an advantage for himself and to cause detriment to that union, by, in September 2013, incurring an expense of $535.76 with respect to the hire of a vehicle and causing this to be paid by the TWU from WA Branch funds.
$1,650
s 287(1)
(v)
Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as
Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU in September 2013 in incurring an expense of $535.76 with respect to the hire of a vehicle and causing this to be paid by the TWU from WA Branch funds, that exercise of powers and discharge of duties having been done neither in good faith in what Mr Burton believed were the best interests of the TWU, nor for a proper purpose.
$1,650
s 286(1)
(v)
Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as
Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU in May 2013, by failing to do so with the degree of care and diligence that a reasonable person would exercise in the circumstances, in that Mr Burton incurred an expense of $535.76 with respect to the hire of a vehicle and caused this to be paid by the TWU from WA Branch funds.
$1,650
s 285(1)
6 Mr Burton’s improper use of his position as Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU to gain an advantage for himself, gain an advantage for others and to cause detriment to that union, by, in September 2013, incurring an expense of $1,634.44 with respect to a function at the WAFL Grand Final and causing this to be paid by the TWU from WA Branch funds.
$1,000
s 287(1)
(vi)
Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as
Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU in September 2013 in incurring an expense of $1,634.44 with respect to a function at the WAFL Grand Final and causing this to be paid by the TWU from WA Branch funds, that exercise of powers and discharge of duties having been done neither in good faith in what Mr Burton believed were the best interests of the TWU, nor for a proper purpose.
$1,000
s 286(1)
(vi)
Mr Burton’s exercise of his powers and discharge of his duties as
Branch Secretary of the WA Branch of the TWU in May 2013, by failing to do so with the degree of care and diligence that a reasonable person would exercise in the circumstances, in that Mr Burton incurred an expense of $1,634.44 with respect to a function at the WAFL Grand Final and causing this to be paid by the TWU from WA Branch funds.
$1,000
s 285(1)

 

Here are some memories of the farce as it was laid out at the TURC.

After some legal argument, the F350 luving Mr James McGiveron was called to the witness box at 10.22.

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Mr McGiveron swore his oath on the bible.

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Mr McGiveron agrees with Mr Scruby that he directed Mr Aslan to type up a redundancy policy, including its contents.

Mr Scruby asked Mr McGiveron if he had only come up with a particular document in the past 12 months in order to answer criticisms of the redundancy/car purchases.   Mr McGiveron answered, "For the past 12 months I've been in bits mate".   Mr Scruby did not follow up on the intriguing statement.

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Mr McGiveron was the boss of the TWU WA Branch.   He now says he had nothing to do with putting the redundancy provisions that he would benefit from together.   It must simply be a  coincidence that the unusually generous redundancy provisions that included allowances like a $9,000 meal allowance and a substantial car allowance (which was interesting given the fully maintained union vehicle, upgraded to the notorious Ford F350).   Mr McGiveron agrees that he participated in passing the resolution that approved the redundancy.   He had no idea that any resolution he passed or monies he approved would result in him obtaining a Ford F350.

He agrees that he sold the Ford F350 - he's been shown a copy of a letter he wrote to the branch after the sale. 

Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 9.01.17 am

In the letter Mr McGiveron states that he "wishes" to return the proceeds of the sale to the branch.   This is no doubt in the "post getting sprung" phase.  He said in the letter that "the cost was playing on his mind".   He stated that he was "humbled" that the union thought so highly of him as to gift him a vehicle, but on later consideration he thought it was a bit costly, so he sold it, and gave the money back.   Nothing at all to do with getting sprung pulling a swifty.

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When the transcript arrives, do a word check on "humbled".   Mr McGiveron has been doing a lot of  "humbling" he loves to humble.

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Mr McGiveron states that "it could happen either way" in relation to approval for the purchase of a motor car - it could be approved before or after.  Doesn't matter.   The Commissioner intervened to make sure this piece of incredible bullshit was accurately recorded by the Commissioner - and McGiveron confirmed that was precisely what he meant.   He could just go and buy a vehicle if he wanted and then get approval to purchase after purchase.   

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Mr McGiveron is in quite a bit of bother.   "I wanted the purchase of the vehicles to be on Burton's watch".   Even though he'd used TWU money to pay the deposit on the two vehicles, even though in the departure agreement he'd get to keep his TWU vehicle.   And he wanted a new one - a very expensive new one.

Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 9.18.28 am

McGiveron doesn't accept that he was putting his own interests ahead of the members interests when he bought the two Ford F350s.

Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 9.22.19 am

 The Commissioner is sadly (for Mr McGiveron) bringing logic from the real world to Mr McGiveron's bullshit story from the bullshit world.   Mr McGiveron looks very uncomfortable.   It is very sad to watch a grown man in these circumstances, he is sticking with his story, it's rather sad.

Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 9.24.31 am

Mr McGiveron is still streaming fantasy from his parallel universe.   He now reckons he had no idea that he would be the beneficiary of the generous redundancy scheme he had instructed Mr Aslan to type up.   He had no idea that the union might be able to get along without the "special projects officer" position he had engineered for himself as he was leaving the secretary position.   He should check out the corporate world more often - "special projects" indeed.

AT 11.30 THE COMMISSION ADJOURNED FOR A SPOT OF TEA AND TIM TAMS

AT 11.47 THE COMMISSION RESUMED

After the parade of two minutes witnesses, the Commissioner has just let us know that he is concerned that anyone should be flown over from Perth for a short time in the witness box.   The Commission is now hearing legal argument in relation to a witness statement and whether or not a particular witness should get on the plane in Perth or not.

Mr Scruby is now (Browne v Dunn) putting those matters which he will later allege constitute various offences to Mr McGiveron - that he knew he'd get the redundancy, that he' be the beneficiary of the redundancy program he designed, that he preferred and pursued his own interests to the detriment of the members etc.

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 Mr McGiveron has now resorted to the "I'm insulted by your question" routine.

(It was a tried and true technique of the Sydney CIB to deliver a similar sentiment to the owners of fine Chinese dineries, "thank you for that superb meal, your chef and sommelier's skills were of such high order that we couldn't possibly insult you by offering to pay".)

Mr Scruby has put to Mr McGiveron that McGiveron didn't actually do any work as "special projects officer".   "I did".   "Well where is that in your statement".   "It's not there, it's just a brief statement".

McGiveron has gone on to state that he was doing various worky things like "gearing himself up" and familiarising himself and stuff like that.   And that was work.   It was planning to do some work, but the actual work he was going to do was never put into effect because "we were expecting 6 and a half thousand jobs in Broome but they never happened".   No his fault.  But he was doing work - which he now says included "gathering information".   Probably by yarning at the pub.

Now talking about being honoured to be President of the union (refer to humbled as well).

It might be nice if this matter was put to Mr McGiveron:

Slush fund money helped fund TWU official's campaign, Ralph Blewitt tells royal commission 

Money from a secret ''slush fund'' controlled by two former officials from the Australian Workers Union was used to help fund an election campaign for an official from the Transport Workers Union, the royal commission on trade unions has heard.

Former Australian Workers Union official Ralph Blewitt, who has confessed to fraud, told the commission on Tuesday he withdrew about $5000 from the slush fund in 1994. He said he gave it to former TWU national president and WA branch secretary Jim McGiveron in a brown paper bag at a cafe in the Perth suburb of Northbridge to help fund his election campaign. Mr McGiveron has reportedly dismissed the claim as false.

He alleged he was acting under instructions from his former AWU colleague Bruce Wilson when he gave the money to a member from the Transport Workers Union in Western Australia in a Perth cafe.

The commission was told Mr Blewitt continued to control cash withdrawals from the secret fund and receive bank statements long after his resignation from the Australian Workers Union.

There is no need for the Commission to hear further evidence from Mr McGiveron - it's all set out by the TWU in this press release.

Jim McGiveron stands down as WA secretary

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Jim McGiveron stands down as WA secretary

Jim McGiveron has done a mighty job for our union but he’s decided it’s time for a change of leadership After 18 successful years at the helm of the WA Branch of the Transport Workers Union Jim McGiveron will stand down as Branch Secretary on December 31.

Jim has been a full-time official of the union for 28 years after joining the union as a full-time organiser back in 1984. Prior to that he had been our convenor on BHP’s Mount Whaleback mine at Newman. Jim has done a mighty job for our union but has decided it is time for a change of leadership.

The union’s Branch Committee of Management has appointed current assistant secretary Rick Burton as Jim’s replacement. Paul Aslan will become Branch Assistant secretary.

Jim will continue in his role as the current TWU national president and will stay with the union for a period as a Special Projects Officer. His new responsibilities will include promoting and growing the TWU’s national interests in the oil and gas industry throughout Australia. His background and vast union experience will prove invaluable in this area.

When Jim McGiveron first took over the WA Branch in 1994 it was struggling financially and losing members. It is now in top financial shape and the union’s membership has grown in 16 of the 18 years he has been at the helm.

A recent audit of the Branch’s books shows we now have 10,076 fully financial members.
Strong membership density creates strength in the workplace and the Branch has also scored highly on the wages and conditions front.

Wages campaigns under Jim’s leadership have consistently delivered pay rises for members that are significantly higher than the rate of inflation.

The success of the Branch over almost two decades has come at a time when other unions have lost members.

Increasingly restrictive industrial laws such as John Howard’s Workchoices have made it a lot tougher for unions to organise and use industrial muscle to further work-related causes. Gone are the days when you could just walk off the job demanding a pay rise or the reinstatement of an unfairly sacked workmate.

These days’ huge financial penalties can be, and are, imposed on unions and workers who overstep the mark.

Soon after he became branch secretary, Jim McGiveron warned a large meeting of TWU members that the playing field was rapidly changing. And if the union was to survive we would have to adapt or die.
Throughout his leadership the union has adapted and today the WA Branch is a very well administered, modern and progressive organisation with a high priority on service to members.

As Jim McGiveron prepares to hand over the reins he can look back with pride on a record that includes many great achievements for members.

His stated aim after taking over the job in 1993 was to leave the Branch in better shape than he found it. He has certainly far exceeded that objective.

 AT 1PM THE COMMISSION ADJOURNED FOR SMOKED SALMON, CAPERS AND ONION

AT 2PM THE COMMISSION RESUMED THE TORTURE

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Mr McGiveron said that he thought the F350 was a union car, bought for the union and for the use of the union.   He denied that he was going to get the car.

He said he didn't know it was purchased and registered in his own name.   Knew nothing about it.

PAUSE FOR SUSPENSE

"May I show you a document".   Counsel assisting produced the rego papers.   In McGiveron's name.  And signed by McGiveron.   Registering the car in his own personal name.

"Do you wish to give an explanation for why it's got your name on it?'

"I don't recall this document."

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"Do you accept that it was inappropriate for the vehicle to be registered in your name?"

"Yes".

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 Mr McGiveron is now waffling a lot.   About why he had a work car and also got a car allowance.

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At 2.30PM Mr Scruby concluded his examination of Mr McGiveron.

Mr McGiveron's counsel is now examining him.   His first best shot is the sympathy vote - how many years of service did you give to the union?

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THE COMMISSION ADJOURNED SHORTLY THEREAFTER.


Tony Fitzgerald made a real and lasting change to Australia's character and he has a warning for us today

Article-6332-hero
 

The Fitzgerald Inquiry

In May 1987 Acting Queensland Premier Bill Gunn ordered a commission of inquiry after the media reported possible police corruption involving illegal gambling and prostitution.  Tony Fitzgerald QC was appointed to lead the "Commission of Inquiry into Possible Illegal Activities and Associated Police Misconduct", known as the Fitzgerald Inquiry.

During the inquiry, the terms of reference were extended to look into "any other matter or thing appertaining to the aforesaid matters", which enabled Fitzgerald to further investigate evidence of political corruption.

Initially expected to last about six weeks, the inquiry spent almost two years conducting a comprehensive investigation of long-term systemic political corruption and abuse of power in Queensland. Public sittings were held on 238 sitting days, hearing testimony from 339 witnesses, and focusing public attention in Queensland and throughout Australia on integrity and accountability in public office including policing.

The Inquiry changed the policing and political landscape in Queensland and across Australia.  Significant prosecutions followed the inquiry leading to four ministers being jailed and numerous convictions of other police. Former Police Commissioner Sir Terence Lewis was convicted of corruption, jailed, and stripped of his knighthood, and former Premier Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen was charged with perjury for evidence given to the inquiry though the trial was aborted due to a hung jury.

The 630-page Fitzgerald report was tabled in Parliament in July 1989. It made over 100 recommendations covering the establishment of the Electoral and Administrative Review Commission and the Criminal Justice Commission (CJC) and reform of the Queensland Police Force.

The above extract is from the Queensland Crime and Corruption Commission's website.

It's a big claim to say that Tony Fitzgerald's enquiry changed the political landscape in Australia, Queensland in particular.

It's also true.

It's in stark contrast to Dyson Heydon who scooped up a smattering of corruption case studies and chronicled the details like a criminals'  clerk.

Can anyone point to a change in Australia as a result of Heydon's enquiry?  

There is much work yet to be done on the ground Heydon and Stoljar lightly raked over.

 

30 years after he commenced his enquiry, Tony Fitzgerald is still contributing to Australia's national character.

Dyson Heydon's work meanwhile lies fallow and incomplete.

 

Politicians with a 'winning at all costs' mentality are damaging Australia

  • Tony Fitzgerald

Australia is a representative democracy. Citizens who are equal, with a shared responsibility for good government, elect people of different backgrounds and perspectives to set community standards. Those elected are not obliged to tell the truth or act in the public interest or forbidden to act in their own interests or the interests of their supporters. They can also enact unjust laws. The law is an expression of power, not justice, and Parliament is almost supreme. 

Since the calibre of those elected is extremely important, it is essential that voters are well-informed, especially now we live in a complex, multicultural nation where multiple interests are in constant conflict and almost every decision attracts strong dissent.

Self-interest is a powerful human impulse. Even so, as Earl Warren, a former US Supreme Court chief justice, pointed out decades ago, "In civilised life, law floats in a sea of ethics. Each is indispensable to civilisation."  

Australians might be more comfortable calling "ethics" the "pub test", but most implicitly accept that society functions best when we respect each other, give each other a "fair go", support the underprivileged and protect the future. Of course, not all agree. A substantial number of people regard ethics and empathy as barriers to success. Many politicians are in that category.

Politics today is a clash of interests, not ideas. The established parties, which receive large sums of public money to finance their campaigns, are controlled by professional, "whatever it takes" politicians driven by self-interest and ideology and addicted to vested interest funding. 

To them, political ethics is merely an amusing oxymoron. Power provides a rich opportunity for personal and political advantage: cronyism, the sale of access and influence and the misuse of public money are now scandalous. There is widespread public contempt for politicians who themselves repeatedly assert that (other) politicians act improperly and accuse each other of misconduct and egregious character defects. Nonetheless, the major parties stubbornly resist effective oversight of politicians' conduct. 

The "winning is all that matters" conduct from politicians affects community attitudes. Australian society is gradually becoming less egalitarian and more cynical and self-centered as economic policies redistribute wealth upwards, widening the gap between "haves" and "have-nots" and producing a largely powerless underclass.

In the circumstances, community unrest and political instability are inevitable, as is the eruption of disruptive ultra-nationalist groups which promote sham nostalgia, foster prejudice, rebrand ignorance as common sense, encourage resentment toward an educated, progressive "elite" and mislead the gullible with crazy theories and empty promises. Not all their supporters are malcontents and ratbags. They also thrive on the anger felt toward the political establishment by ordinary people who see themselves as outsiders. 

The same dark populism has taken root in other democracies. Freedom of communication is essential to democracy; responsibly exercised, it helps voters make informed decisions. It is also democracy's Achilles heel because of the ease with which it can be exploited. Modern technology makes mass deception and vicious personal abuse easy, especially for those with public voices.

Politicians will find it impossible to regain public trust unless they behave like normal, honourable people: treat everyone equally, tell the truth, explain decisions, disclose any direct or indirect benefits for themselves or their allies and do not:

  •  mislead or deceive or withhold material information unless it is in the public interest;
  •  have regard to any matter except the public interest when making decisions;
  •  spend public money for any purpose except the public benefit; or
  •  directly or indirectly use public office or information gained in the course of public office for personal or political benefit.

At the moment, that is an impossible dream. However, we owe it to today's children and their children to do what we can. Reform is possible despite political opposition if enough voters really value true democracy.

The obvious starting point is an effective national anti-corruption organisation, an independent parliamentary integrity commissioner with investigative powers and a multi-party parliamentary committee to penalise breaches.

Those to whom democracy is less important than ideology are of course free to vote as they choose and to continue complaining as political chaos escalates.

Tony Fitzgerald is a former judge, who led an inquiry into corruption in Queensland.

 

ENDS

Here are two brief extracts from Fitzgerald's final report.  Wise words and we'd do well to listen.

 

The Role of the Media

The media is one of the most important and effective mechanisms for the control of powerful institutions and individuals by reason of its ability to sway public opinion. Those who wish to mould public opinion must do so largely through the media.

The media played a part in exposing corruption, and two media organizations contributed to the setting up of this Inquiry.

Unfortunately it is also true that parts of the media in this State have over the years contributed to a climate in which misconduct has flourished. Fitting in with the system and associating with and developing a mutual interdependence with those in power have had obvious benefits.

3.9.2 News Management
The complementary techniques of secrecy and news management allow governments to exercise substantial

and often disproportionate influence on what is published in the media.

The media is able to be used by politicians, police officers and other public officials who wish to put out propaganda to advance their own interests and harm their enemies. A hunger for “leaks” and “scoops” (which sometimes precipitates the events which they predict) and some journalists’ relationships with the sources who provide them with information, can make it difficult for the media to maintain its independence and a critical stance. Searches for motivation, and even checks for accuracy may suffer as a result.

In Queensland, Government reports and information are invariably “leaked” to selected journalists who are able to delude themselves that they are not being used, but on the contrary are establishing and maintaining contacts which help them in their appointed task of discovering information and communicating it to the public. Should these journalists ever “bite the hand that feeds them”, the flow of information would presumably dry up, or be diverted to a rival media outlet or colleague.

Instead of “leaks” becoming an alternative to official information, they become a way of making the media act as a mouthpiece for factions within the Government.

This places an extra responsibility on the journalist. Both the journalist and the source have a mutual interest: both want a headline. Yet if the journalist is so undiscriminating that the perspective taken serves the purposes of the source, then true independence is lost, and with it the right to the special privileges and considerations which are usually claimed by the media because of its claimed independence and “watchdog” role. If the independence and the role are lost, so is the claim to special considerations.

 

The Professional Adviser

Crime and law enforcement today take place in a complicated commercial and legal world. Elaborate commercial dealings are part of normal business as well as being used as a facade for crime.

Therefore criminals need skilful advisers. Just as corrupt police and officials disgrace their office, some professional advisers disgrace their professions by becoming the handmaidens of crime. Organized criminals pay well for all-too-good advice about how to avoid being detected and punished. They are advised how to structure and mask dealings to avoid detection, how to complicate the “paper trail” to illegal funds and activities, how to exploit the protections, rights and privileges which the criminal law affords and how to acquire and maintain the facade of respectability.

Some professional advisers become directly involved in criminal activity. Others do not go so far, but still assist criminals to use illicit profits and achieve their ends. For example, a solicitor may be retained to do property conveyance. He does the task properly, without committing stamp duty fraud, or using false declarations or false names, but he knows the money being used to buy the property is the profits from a string of brothels, or worse, from drug trafficking or child pornography. The solicitor has done nothing illegal, but he has helped the criminal.

Professional bodies and associations, aware of the possibility that their members’ services may be used for ulterior or illegal purposes, have addressed the issue in ethical codes. These codes often do not adequately cover the complicated moral issues involved.

The issue of when professional advisers should be required to refuse services to potential clients is beyond the scope of this report, but must be tackled.

The fact that such advisers are available to organized crime is an acute example of community cynicism and the general failure of individuals and groups to take moral responsibility for their actions.

Lawyers are not obliged to advise clients how to evade the law, and are not obliged to turn a blind eye to questionable activities, even if they are not illegal.

The Commission heard evidence of solicitors who helped conduct property transactions which involved undeclared cash considerations to avoid stamp duty and the use of false names. These solicitors said that they did not know the activities to be illegal, and therefore they had no ethical obligation not to act.

The wealth, history and prestige of the legal profession can give moral torpor an aura of respectability, but in fact means there is less excuse. Claiming high standards of personal probity while knowingly helping criminals achieve their ends is hypocrisy.

Professions, including lawyers, accountants and journalists, need to recall that their profes- sional codes are not replacements for personal probity, but guidelines for its exercise.

ENDS

 

 


GILLARD and the Trust Fund for Wilson that make mockery of her claims about the AWU WRA Inc

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May I thank StephenJ for the many many hours of work he's put into this issue.

It's important that GILLARD and WILSON's lies about her engagement as a lawyer and provider of legal advice on the AWU WRA are exposed.

The more evidence that she's lying the harder it is for her to avoid the charge that she was a participant in the conspiracy.

Two of her big lies are that she thought Ralph was a property investor and that the incorporated WRA was needed to handle team fractures.

That's where the previously hidden Trust Fund she set up for Wilson for the Boulder death benefit funds becomes so significant.

  1. The attempt to set up the WRA caused more than a few problems.
  2. It can only be explained by the need to have an incorporated body with the right name covered by a regime that was lax.

2a Theiss needed to be in a situation where if things went wrong they could protest that they thought they were dealing with the AWU for legitimate Union activities.Not too many years before Normie Gallagher had been slotted for secret commissions. Thiess was naturally wary in those circumstances.

  1. No financial statements for incorporated associations were required to be lodged. Tax Office as a rule uninterested in Incorporated associations as no taxable income generated.

4.Only alternative was a Company. Wouldn’t get the name up. Financial information required in annual return. If no tax return lodged could attract attention of Tax Office.

  1. If Trust used still needed a Corporate Trustee with the right name. Same problems as point 4.
  2. If she really wanted to set up an election fund controlled by Wilson she had the perfect example with the Accident fund trust deed.

The arrangement allowed for contributions from potential beneficiaries and gave Wilson complete control.

She could have obtained a shelf company to act as trustee; made Wilson and Blewitt directors and shareholders; executed the Trust deed using the accident fund as an example; and they were off. The Trust itself could last for 80 years (the perpetuity period in WA). That should be long enough for the boys. The rights of the beneficiaries to interfere in any meaningful sense can be handled by appropriate definitions as was the case with the Accident trust deed.

No nasty Corporate Affairs people to deal with; no need to draft objects that obscured the purposes of the vehicle; no need to manufacture the right to a ministerial appeal; no need for the appeal itself.

http://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2017/02/no-wonder-gillard-wanted-to-hide-the-trust-fund-she-set-up-for-bruce-wilson.html

  1. The fact that the Accident fund Trust deed was executed around the same time as the Incorporation occurred and she was involved in it shows that she cannot have been unaware that it provided a much simpler solution to her supposed problem of creating an election fund that didn’t disappear on a fracture in the team.

This leads inevitably to the conclusion that her stated reason is a lie.

If there are two scenarios available to explain the motivation behind an action and one of them is demonstrated to be false the alternative must be true.

The alternative is that she fully understood how the WRA was intended to be used and that makes her a party to any crimes that resulted.

And Stephen J has demonstrated for us precisely how easy it would have been to use Gillard's Fatality Fund deed as the template for Wilson's election fund. 

 

Stephen J's proposed Memo to Bruce Wilson from GILLARD

Dear Bruce

As you are well aware we have recently put together the documents necessary for the group you lead to obtain Incorporation under the Western Australian Associations Incorporations Act.

We have also been involved in implementing a new Trust Deed for the Miners Accident and Death Fund.

I have provided my services on the Incorporation without charge in recognition of the substantial fees generated for Slater & Gordon by the AWU and our own relationship.

I have also (in recognition of your desire to keep to a minimum outside knowledge of the proposed Incorporated Association) kept all notes and documents associated with this outside the formal filing system at the Firm.

Despite the above facts it is still necessary for me to record this advice to you to provide a record of addressing certain issues going to my duty of care to you.

1. Instructions

You have advised that you represent a group of WA Branch officials and members who wish to set up a fund which will assist with their election expenses.

You wish this fund to be unaffected by any disputes about ownership should disagreements arise between members of the group.

You see the contributions to this fund primarily coming from the members individually or joint fund raising efforts.

You wish for a strong focus on Workplace Reform to be specifically mentioned in the Fund documents.

You can see scope for some funds to be obtained through the provision of services related to this area.

2. Problems with Incorporation

The documents relating to this have not as yet been lodged however in the course of their preparation the following potential problems have come to our attention.

They all appear to impact on the achievement of your aims.

 

a) The Name 

You have been insistent that the name of the Association should, on adoption of the rules by your group prior to application for Incorporation, be “the Australian Workers Union – Workplace Reform Association”.

There are provisions in the Act preventing the use of misleading names and unfortunately this name indicates that the Association is somehow part of the AWU.

You of course have also been insistent that the Association is to be legally separate from the Union.

b) Trade Union

The Act prevents bodies carrying on activities affecting employment relations from being eligible for incorporation.

The emphasis on workplace reform and the use of the Union name are likely to cause issues with this.

c) Purpose of Trading

The Act makes ineligible for Incorporation  Associations formed for the purpose of trading or securing a pecuniary profit for members.

Depending on the form the assistance with election expenses takes there may be issues with the second limb of this.

Additionally the extent to which workplace reform services are intended to be provided may impact on the trading question.

d) Distribution of Property

No part of the property of the Association is able to be distributed to members except in the promotion of its objects.

The assets must effectively go to another body with similar objects should it be desired to terminate the Association.

c) Control

The control of the Association rests with the Committee which is elected by the Members.

A minimum of 6 members is required.

Should a dispute arise between yourself and other members of your group control of the Association will not necessarily rest with you.

 

3. Alternative Structure

We have recently finalised the new Trust deed for the Accident and Death Fund.

This process has squarely raised with me the issue of whether it may be more efficient and appropriate to use a variant of that Trust Deed with a Corporate Trustee to achieve your aims.

A Corporate Trustee is necessary because of your desire to keep the entity separate from the AWU.

For this reason it would not be appropriate to use the State registered Union as Trustee as was the case with the Accident Fund.

The Corporate Trustee can be put in place immediately by simply obtaining a shelf Company and changing its name.

Unfortunately it is unlikely that the use of AWU in the Company name will be allowed however we may be able to use it in the name of the Trust as long as there are no objections from the Union or anyone the Trustee deals with.

There is no need to gain approval of the CAC to any of this.

The issues in b), c) and d) above simply do not arise and it is possible for you to have complete control over the Trustee and hence the operation and distribution of the property of the Trust. 

Your desire to have Ralph Blewitt involved in the management can be achieved by making both you and he Directors of the Trustee.

Both of you will hold one share but you again can control his share and his continuance as a Director by a simple declaration of trust in relation to that share in your favour. Alternatively you could arrange for the issue of an additional share to yourself.

I have prepared an attached draft of the Trust Deed.

Examination of it will demonstrate the above points. 

The Association is a structure that typically attracts very little regulatory attention.

In WA for example no Financial Statements need to be lodged.

The Tax Office is rarely concerned with them as generally no taxable income is produced.

In relation to Companies however I am aware that follow up action is sometimes initiated if taxation returns are not lodged.

Of course it would be a taxation return for the “Trust” that would be required but these facts sometimes come to the attention of the Tax Office because of the above process.

These factors should not concern you as any tax based on your instructions should be minimal.

 

4. Final

I will of course assist in any way I can with the Incorporation process for the Association should you desire to continue along that path but its success appears to me to be problematic at this stage.

You should however consider the alternative which given the likely problems referred to above would appear to me to be the preferable course.

 

Julia

April 16, 1992

 

The changes to the Fatality Fund necessary to achieve Wilson's purported aim or instructions to Gillard are all in this file.

Download WRA Trust

A few changes to the front page (note date of filing, identical to AWU WRA Inc)

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The addition of a few crystal clear clauses:

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And a signature page to give effect to the Trust and Fund.

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But instead of doing that, capitalising on the work already done and avoiding all the dramas with the AWU WRA Inc - Gillard spent two months fighting to get the Association incorporated.

Was that the action of an arm's length lawyer providing genuine legal advice - particularly in circumstances where she was also working on the Trust Deed?

I think a jury would be entitled to draw inferences from these and other facts.

I do.

She was part of the conspiracy with Wilson.

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