Bob Kernohan is a pretty good judge of how fair dinkum police are.
The lucky shareholders in Wannunup Development company get a very, very good deal

Bullshit jobs.

How spot on is Adam Creighton's report from last Friday in The Australian

US Shutdown reveals useless 'work'

THE US government shutdown provides a timely juncture to consider one of the principal maladies afflicting modern democracies: the growth of "bullshit jobs".

David Graeber, a professor of anthropology at the London School of Economics, belled the cat on the phenomenon in August, bemoaning the growing share of work that was pointless and even damaging.

"Huge swathes of people in the Western world spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed," Graeber writes, dismissing jobs in corporate law, academic and health administration, human resources and public relations as "bullshit".

"The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound," he says.

So is the economic.

This week's partial US government shutdown illustrates just how pervasive bullshit jobs have become. That the Obama government has stood down around 800,000 public service jobs with close to zero impact on the ordinary business of life is remarkable.

The world's press has ferreted around for days trying to find in the shutdown something genuinely disruptive. It appears closure of National Parks, public monuments and cessation of a live "panda cam" at the National Zoo are the most damaging repercussions. To be sure, tourists and panda-lovers across the US are understandably miffed. But surely the deeper question here is what on earth were the other 750,000-plus, "non-essential" public servants doing?

If these jobs weren't "essential" -- government "shutdowns" in the US do not affect air traffic controllers or soldiers, for instance -- then the US government should explain why it is taxing people and businesses to pay for them. Public servants' wages are someone else's property, which should not be taken lightly. Far from damaging the US economy, the shutdown has temporarily relieved US taxpayers of the burden of paying an army of people to do things that were self-evidently unnecessary.

Concentration of bullshit jobs in the federal public service is not unique to the US. Canberra, as much as Washington DC, houses departments teeming with highly-paid people who seek to regulate health, education, agriculture and commerce, for instance, but whose staff could go on strike for a year without causing a ripple of concern among the wider populace. In the US, as in Australia, most useful services -- police, courts, teachers, hospitals and bus drivers, for example -- are employed by state governments.

This is why federal public servants, unlike their state counterparts, rarely if ever go on strike: sheer embarrassment.

 

Bullshit jobs

THE US government shutdown provides a timely juncture to consider one of the principal maladies afflicting modern democracies: the growth of "bullshit jobs".

David Graeber, a professor of anthropology at the London School of Economics, belled the cat on the phenomenon in August, bemoaning the growing share of work that was pointless and even damaging.

"Huge swathes of people in the Western world spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed," Graeber writes, dismissing jobs in corporate law, academic and health administration, human resources and public relations as "bullshit".

"The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound," he says.

So is the economic.

This week's partial US government shutdown illustrates just how pervasive bullshit jobs have become. That the Obama government has stood down around 800,000 public service jobs with close to zero impact on the ordinary business of life is remarkable.

The world's press has ferreted around for days trying to find in the shutdown something genuinely disruptive. It appears closure of National Parks, public monuments and cessation of a live "panda cam" at the National Zoo are the most damaging repercussions. To be sure, tourists and panda-lovers across the US are understandably miffed. But surely the deeper question here is what on earth were the other 750,000-plus, "non-essential" public servants doing?

If these jobs weren't "essential" -- government "shutdowns" in the US do not affect air traffic controllers or soldiers, for instance -- then the US government should explain why it is taxing people and businesses to pay for them. Public servants' wages are someone else's property, which should not be taken lightly. Far from damaging the US economy, the shutdown has temporarily relieved US taxpayers of the burden of paying an army of people to do things that were self-evidently unnecessary.

Concentration of bullshit jobs in the federal public service is not unique to the US. Canberra, as much as Washington DC, houses departments teeming with highly-paid people who seek to regulate health, education, agriculture and commerce, for instance, but whose staff could go on strike for a year without causing a ripple of concern among the wider populace. In the US, as in Australia, most useful services -- police, courts, teachers, hospitals and bus drivers, for example -- are employed by state governments.

This is why federal public servants, unlike their state counterparts, rarely if ever go on strike: sheer embarrassment.

- See more at: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/opinion/shutdown-reveals-useless-work/story-fnc2jivw-1226732558702#sthash.M5mp88Mh.56ornq92.dpuf

THE US government shutdown provides a timely juncture to consider one of the principal maladies afflicting modern democracies: the growth of "bullshit jobs".

David Graeber, a professor of anthropology at the London School of Economics, belled the cat on the phenomenon in August, bemoaning the growing share of work that was pointless and even damaging.

"Huge swathes of people in the Western world spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed," Graeber writes, dismissing jobs in corporate law, academic and health administration, human resources and public relations as "bullshit".

"The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound," he says.

So is the economic.

This week's partial US government shutdown illustrates just how pervasive bullshit jobs have become. That the Obama government has stood down around 800,000 public service jobs with close to zero impact on the ordinary business of life is remarkable.

The world's press has ferreted around for days trying to find in the shutdown something genuinely disruptive. It appears closure of National Parks, public monuments and cessation of a live "panda cam" at the National Zoo are the most damaging repercussions. To be sure, tourists and panda-lovers across the US are understandably miffed. But surely the deeper question here is what on earth were the other 750,000-plus, "non-essential" public servants doing?

If these jobs weren't "essential" -- government "shutdowns" in the US do not affect air traffic controllers or soldiers, for instance -- then the US government should explain why it is taxing people and businesses to pay for them. Public servants' wages are someone else's property, which should not be taken lightly. Far from damaging the US economy, the shutdown has temporarily relieved US taxpayers of the burden of paying an army of people to do things that were self-evidently unnecessary.

Concentration of bullshit jobs in the federal public service is not unique to the US. Canberra, as much as Washington DC, houses departments teeming with highly-paid people who seek to regulate health, education, agriculture and commerce, for instance, but whose staff could go on strike for a year without causing a ripple of concern among the wider populace. In the US, as in Australia, most useful services -- police, courts, teachers, hospitals and bus drivers, for example -- are employed by state governments.

This is why federal public servants, unlike their state counterparts, rarely if ever go on strike: sheer embarrassment.

- See more at: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/opinion/shutdown-reveals-useless-work/story-fnc2jivw-1226732558702#sthash.M5mp88Mh.56ornq92.dpuf

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