Some intriguing grabs from the Western Australian Parliamentary Hansard around the time of The AWU Scandal
When political parties play up on Facebook, ABC crack investigative operatives descend. Police raid serving PM's former office? Sorry, it's not news.

The Dawesville Channel, overall cost (to the Wannunup Development Company) $63.4M - WA Govt contribution $56.7M

I have read the contract agreed on 6 January, 1992 with Wannunup.   I would rather be a shareholder in Wannunup than a WA taxpayer.   I'll bring you the contracts next post.

This excerpt from "The Decline and Rescue of an Ecosystem" by Keith Bradby, 1997 has been an invaluable guide in seeking out the further source documents that tell the story of the award of the Dawesville Channel "contract" gift.

Dawesville channel book

The Western Australian Parliament had some fascinating proceedings on Tuesday, 12 April, 1994.

Here's a part of the action in the upper house, the Legislative Council.   Go to the page from the Hansard for the day and "CTRL F" search for Dawesville.   You should get 17 entries.   Here's how a public reserve bit the dust, to be replaced down the track, you know, gradually, as time permits by another different future public reserve.   You can't sell parks.

The Deputy Chairman of Committees (Hon Murray Montgomery) in the Chair;
Hon George Cash (Minister for Lands) in charge of the Bill.
The amendment made by the Assembly was as follows -
New clause 32
Page 12, after line 27 - To insert the following section -
Reserve No. 2851 in the City of Mandurah
32. The classification as of Class A of Reserve No. 2851,
containing 116.121 1 hectares, set apart for "Recreation and
Camping" and vested in the City of Mandurah, is cancelled.
Hon GEORGE CASH: I move - That the amendment made by the Assembly be agreed to. As part of the overall implementation of agreements associated with the Dawesville
Channel project and adjacent land developments, the Caddadup reserve to the south of
the channel is proposed to be developed as part of a master plan for active recreational
facilities, necessary public utilities and areas retained for conservation and foreshore
management. Facilities proposed to be developed include a public golf course, baseball.
soccer, basketball, netball, cricket, football, hockey and rugby. In addition, a rubbish
transfer station is proposed to be established on an area of the reserve that will be severed by a deviation to the Old Coast Road required to replace the sanitary landfill site subsumed by the Dawesville project. The Water Authority of Western Australia also
requires a site for a waste water treatment plant essential to developments in the area.
Under normal circumstances the approval of the Parliament would be sought to excise
various areas of land for these purposes and to separately reserve them. However, as
these land uses will occur over a period of time as and when required, and the exact areas are yet to be defined on the ground by survey, it is considered expedient for the current A classification of the Caddadup reserve to be cancelled so that the reserve changes can be considered by His Excellency the Governor, as for all other class C reserves when the need arises.

Too easy.   Problem solved.   Here's the Legislative Assembly (lower house, the house of government) on 7 April, 1994.   CTRL F search for Dawesville and you'll get 21 entries.   Here's the detailed stuff about the launch, costs and other specifications.

DAWESVILLE CUT - OPENING DATE


Monitoring Program; Peel-Harvey Regional Park, Establishment. Mrs HENDERSON to the Minister for the Environment:


(1) When is the Dawesville Cut scheduled to open?
(2) Who is the official proponent for the Dawesville Cut?
(3) What was the cost of construction of the Dawesville Cut?
(4) How much did the Government contribute to the overall cost of the
Dawesville Cut?
(5) Has the monitoring and management program for the Dawvesville Cut been
implemented?
(6) If not, why not?
(7) If so, would the Minister provide a copy of the program and the results of
the monitoring?
(8) Does the monitoring and management program for the Dawesviile Cut
include studies of fish and waterfowl populations in the Peel Inlet and
Harvey Estuary?
(9) If not, why not?
(10) If so, will the Minister provide copies of these reports?
(11) Has baseline monitoring of fish, waterbirds and fringing vegetation in the
Peel-Harvey system been carried out?
(12) If not, why not?
(13) If so, will the Minister provide copies of these reports?
(14) Does the monitoring and management program also include studies of salt
marsh mosquitoes which are known to spread the Ross River virus?
(15) If not, why not?
(16) Will all of the required baseline studies have been completed prior to the
opening of the Dawesville Cut?
(17) If not, why not?
(18) How much funding has been allocated to the monitoring program for the
Dawesville Cut?
(19) Who has carried out these monitoring studies?
(20) Has the integrated catchment management plan for the Peel-Harvey
system been implemented?
(21) If not, why not?
(22) Is the moratorium on clearing and drainage in the Peel-Harvey catchment
still in force?
(23) If not, why not?
(24) Have the ministerial conditions on phosphorus input and concentration in
the Peel-Harvey system been met?
(25) If not, why not?
(26) Has the Peel-Harvey Regional Park been established?
(27) If not, why not?

Mr MINSON replied:
(1) The formal opening of the Dawesville Channel is on 23 April 1994.
(2) Under the Environmental Protection Act, the Ministers for Transport and
Primary Industry are the joint proponents for the Peel Inlet and Harvey
Estuary Management Statutory, which includes construction of the
Dawesville Channel.
(3) The cost of construction of the Dawesville Channel is $63.468m.
(4) The Government contribution to the overall cost of construction of the
Dawesville Channel is $56.7 17m.
(5) Yes. It is an ongoing program which has begun.
(6) Not applicable.
(7) The monitoring program is currently being put in place and detailed
information will be provided at the opening of the Dawesville Channel.
(8) Yes.
(9) Not applicable.
(10) Monitoring has only just begun for some programs and is in the planning
stage for others. No reports are available at this early stage.
(11) Considerable monitoring of fish, water birds and fringing vegetation has
taken place over a number of years as part of the Peel-Harvey
investigations and the results are contained in a number of reports which
have been published and are available.
(12) Not applicable.
(13) Answeredby (11).
(14) Yes. This work will be an extension of a considerable amount of work
that has already been carried out by the Health Department and the
Waterways Commission together with local government.
(15) Not applicable.
(16) Sufficient monitoring prior to the opening of the Dawesville Channel has
been carried out to allow a full evaluation of its performance and impacts.
(17) Not applicable.
(18) Additional funding of $200 000 has been allocated in 1993-94. Further
monitoring will be carried out within existing budget allocations. Funding
for future years has been separately identified and will be the subject of
the normal budget process.
(19) Monitoring has been carried out by the Departments of Transport, Health,
Fisheries and CALM, and the Waterways Commission. A social impact
assessment and public information program will be coordinated by the
Waterways Commission.
(20) Integrated catchment management. in the Peel-Harvey catchment is
ongoing and considerable advances have been made.
(21) Not applicable.
(22) Yes, but it has been superseded to a great degree by statutory planning and
environmental protection policies. Proposals involving clearing and
drainage are carefully assessed and appropriate catcbment management
measures incorporated if they are approved.

(23) Not applicable.
(24) Significant progress has been made in meeting the phosphorus input and
concentration targets for the Peel-Harvey system and I am confident they
will be met when the many catchment management measures are fully
implemented.
(25) Answered by (24).
(26) No.
(27) Planning for the establishment of the Peel-Hanecy Regional Park is well
advanced, It is a very complex proposal and has required considerable
consultation and the resolution of a number of difficult issues.

Contracts coming soon.   Such things in them as will amaze you.  

 

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