Barry O'Farrell seems happiest doing nothing. Note to Barry's staff, let him play to his strength.
The Adelaide University/YWCA survey following Julia Gillard's time as Prime Minister

Fairfax and The Age were right on top of that internet thing and newspapers in 1997

Larry Page and Sergey Brin met at Stanford University in 1995.   By 1997 they had registered their internet domain - google.com

On 30 October 1997 Fairfax's The Age put those internet guys right back in their place!    The editor and publisher of The Age Mr Steve Harris delivered the AN Smith Memorial Lecture at Melbourne Uni and shared this with the audience:

He said the case against newspapers rested on two points: that customers wanted to control their own media menu, and that "the consumer will rush to interact with content, be it information or advertising".

But experiments with interactive pay TV on a German formula one motor race - where viewers could choose camera angles - had been a flop.

And he believed readers wanted more than to dictate the stories and advertisements they wished to read because they were constantly casting about for what was novel.

"Computers, for all their attractions, lack judgment, which is what editors bring to newspapers," he said.

So there nerdy Stanford internet guys.  Remember the lesson of the German formula one race?   No?   Well we do.  Nerdy IT guys.....

The Age

Future of print news fine: Age chief

Author: STEPHEN CAUCHI
Date: 30/10/1997
Words: 315
          Publication: The Age
Section: NEWS
Page: 9
Newspapers stood to benefit from the Internet-sparked information explosion, the editor-in-chief and publisher of The Age, Mr Steve Harris, said last night.

Mr Harris, delivering the A. N. Smith memorial lecture in journalism at Melbourne University, said that although the Internet and online news would change newspapers, there would always be demand for print news.

"Print is the oldest technology of all. And it is in excellent shape," he said.

He said the case against newspapers rested on two points: that customers wanted to control their own media menu, and that "the consumer will rush to interact with content, be it information or advertising".

But experiments with interactive pay TV on a German formula one motor race - where viewers could choose camera angles - had been a flop.

And he believed readers wanted more than to dictate the stories and advertisements they wished to read because they were constantly casting about for what was novel.

"Computers, for all their attractions, lack judgment, which is what editors bring to newspapers," he said.

"In a fragmented media world, familiar and trusted brands will become even more popular. A newspaper like The Age is a very strong brand and will get stronger."

But he warned that many news outlets - broadcasters included - had to improve.

"Within our newsrooms we have too many pockets of negativism, arrogance, sneering cynicism, confrontationism . . . newspapers have not been sufficiently astute to the changing needs of the community."

Mr Harris said his dual role as publisher and editor-in-chief of The Age would not compromise the paper's editorial independence, although "some quarters" saw him as "threatening the very fabric of journalism".

"It is imperative for the commercial side of the business to be cognisant of the integrity and value of editorial, and for editorial to be cognisant of the need of the company to be financially strong."

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